DESIGNING A FOG-HARVESTING HARP

AN INDUSTRIAL DESIGN COLLABORATION WITH SCIENTIFIC RESEARCHERS
Author:
Brook Kennedy, Jonathan Boreyko, Weiwei Shi, Mark Anderson, Josh Tulkoff, Tom Van der Sloot
Company/School:
Virginia Tech

 

It is well known that research universities provide fertile ground for interdisciplinary work between science, engineering, design and other fields. Specifically, in industrial design, faculty and students have the opportunity to translate new discoveries and technologies into useful inventions- for both societal impact and commercial benefit. To date, a great deal has been written about the innovative output and educational value of interdisciplinary collaboration, leveraging applied research, problem solving (McDermott, Boradkar & Zunjarward 2014) and campus entrepreneurship (Etzkowitz, 2000). But, there is also growing evidence that industrial design faculty and students can form worthwhile partnerships with scientific research as well, to help develop new technology earlier in the innovation pipeline: through producing lab test mockups, envisioning product applications of discoveries and in helping define research goals early on (Driver, Peralta & Moultrie 2011). Distinct in many ways from the kind of professional industrial design work conducted in the private sector, this “lab-integrated industrial design,” for lack of an established term, also provides unique student learning experiences: namely, the industrial design student can be completely integrated from day one in a research program rather than serving a more traditional “translational” role after the fact. For this educational reason along with significant design research output potential, such collaborative, interdisciplinary partnerships with scientific research should not (...read more).

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