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Tokyo Style

So you love sushi, sleep on a futon, drink green tea—why not take your Nippon-adoration one step further by infusing your surroundings with a few Japanese touches? The best place to start is this look book bursting with full-page color photographs of apartments, houses, and hotels throughout the city. Whether it's a high-rise apartment overlooking Tokyo, a boutique hotel, or a house made of fiberglass, each dwelling herein will awaken the Japanese spirit within you. For a real treat, why not sip a sake while you peruse the pages?

Useful Small Things: Items from the Under a Fiver Collections

Everyday, low-cost, and mass-produced items gathered from around the world showcasing innovative design. This book presents a delightful collection of mass-produced objects that provide insight into the things that surround us. Common items such as nails, plugs, toothbrushes, soap, gloves, and sweets have their own function and differ in design from country to country and region to region. Some are examples of good and practical design, while others fail to fulfill their function.

Visual Strategies: A Practical Guide to Graphics for Scientists and Engineers

Any scientist or engineer who communicates research results will immediately recognize this practical handbook as an indispensable tool. The guide sets out clear strategies and offers abundant examples to assist researchers—even those with no previous design training—with creating effective visual graphics for use in multiple contexts, including journal submissions, grant proposals, conference posters, or presentations.

Communicating Design

Successful web design teams depend on clear communication between developers and their clients—and among members of the development team. Wireframes, site maps, flow charts, and other design diagrams establish a common language so designers and project teams can capture ideas, track progress, and keep their stakeholders informed.

Dieter Rams: As Little Design as Possible

"Indifference towards people and the reality in which they live is actually the one and only cardinal sin in design" —Dieter Rams. Dieter Rams' life and work are indelibly linked to his thoughts about how people live, and how they can live better. Products he designed in the 1960s are still being produced and sold today—only one demonstration of the strength of his work.

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